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Posts tagged ‘dirty draft’

First Monday Mentoring June 2019 – why most writing advice you’re given is wrong

Welcome to First Monday Mentoring when I drill down into the reality of being a writer This month’s question comes from a new writer. Confused by the conflicting information available, he asked what writing advice he should take.

First let’s look at a fraction of what’s out there. Start with character. Start with plot. Start with a brilliant idea. Don’t kill the cat. Write from the heart. Show don’t tell. Write what you know. Write what you can imagine.

Write five hundred words every day. Or a thousand. Or five thousand. Don’t preach to readers. Write a morality tale disguised. Start with a theme. Discover your theme as you write. Use the hero’s journey, bullet points, clustering, brainstorming or whatever else is on trend.

The truth is, they are all wrong for some writers. They are also totally right for some writers. The only way to know is to try them. And even that is moot. According to Yoda, the wizened green sage from Star Wars, “Try not. Do or do not. There is no try.”

Of course Yoda never said that. He’s a made-up character (spoiler, sorry).Yoda’s wisdom comes from Star Wars creator, George Lucas and screenwriter. Lawrence Kasdan, although Kasdan was credited with that specific line here http://tinyurl.com/y2rr94co. Given the years they put into the writing, I wonder if Lucas or Kasdan would still say there is no try, even though it’s quoted everywhere.

More interesting to me is Kasdan’s observation from the same interview:

“I’ve always felt that genre is a vessel into which you put your story…”If you want to make a western, you can tell any story in the world in a western, you know? It can be about family, betrayal, revenge, the opening up of the country…Those stories never get old, because they are issues everybody faces every day. Who do you trust? What are the temptations in your life?

Even when you get to be my age, you’re still trying to figure that out…  What am I, what am I about, have [I] fulfilled my potential, and, if not, is there still time? That’s what the Star Wars saga is about.”

If you were free to choose the vessel that fits your work best, would some of the writing advice suddenly make sense? Could your story work best in the “vessel” of a romance, a fantasy, sci-fi, mystery, historical?

To me writing has always been a mix of good ideas, good writing and good timing. How many great books were rejected then published to huge acclaim when the market was ready?

When I mentor each year’s winner of the Valerie Parv Award run by Romance Writers of Australia, I give what guidance I can then advise the writer to use what they like of my suggestions and discard the rest. To me the author is always the final arbiter of their own work even if the market needs time to catch up.

Then, like Lawrence Kasdan’s comments, there’s advice that make so much sense, it becomes a meme on social media. One such is Nora Roberts’s maxim that you can fix a bad page but you can’t fix a blank page. In other words, write something, anything. Most writing is rewriting anyway. You write what Nora calls a “dirty draft” you can trim, add and edit to reach a semblance of your story vision.

Accept that there’s no such thing as a perfect story. Humans are by nature imperfect. How can our stories be any different? I’ll leave you with two quotes from acclaimed Chilean writer, the late Isabel Allende –

–          Don’t be paralysed by the idea that you’re writing a book. Just write.

–          Show up and be patient. I can hit my head against the wall because [the writing’s] not happening. But just keep   going. Keep going and it happens.

How do you keep the writing going? What advice speaks to you? Share your thoughts in the box below. I moderate comments to avoid spam. Your post can appear right away if you click on “sign me up” at right. I don’t share your details with anyone.

Keep writing. Keep writing.

Valerie

www.valerieparv.com

Appearing at Romance Writers of Australia’s

National Conference Sun 11 August 1-2pm

With my agent Linda Tate we’re presenting

Getting back the joy of writing”

http://tinyurl.com/y52tghw4

First Monday Mentoring August – why am I so good at putting off writing?

Welcome to First Monday Mentoring when you’re invited to ask questions and share your experiences of being a writer – not the glamour side, but the realities hardly anybody talks about.

One big question rarely addressed is the problem of not writing. The dreaded P word – procrastination. You know the problem – you desperately want to write and you finally steal a few hours to yourself. You even have a fabulous idea you can’t wait to explore. You sit down at your keyboard and…Zilch. Nada. Nothing.

The words that sparkled in your head when you woke up that morning have been sucked away as if down a drain. You find yourself doing almost anything but facing that blank screen.

Okay, you get the idea. So what is the problem and what can you do about it?

First, cut yourself some slack. Creative work doesn’t run to a timetable. Nor can you produce something new without at least some struggle. That’s why you don’t try to write the perfect novel at first draft. You try to write something approaching your idea for a novel – what Nora Roberts calls “the dirty draft.”

The aim of a dirty draft is to get the story, chapter, scene or sentence down in some form. Even Michelangelo had to throw raw clay into a heap before he could shape it into the vision in his head. And that’s before he tackled the unforgiving marble.

Writers are lucky that we don’t have to work in stone. Everything can be changed. And trust me, it’s far easier to change a rough draft than to stare at the screen until sweat beads your brow.

Instead of going off to clean the fridge, force yourself to stay put. Write something, anything. Write a letter to yourself describing the story in your head. Sneak up on the story by writing around the scene. Draw the scene as a stick-figure cartoon. Write a ransom note from one character to another.

This kind of craziness can have a surprising result. You get caught up in the story almost against your will and you start writing. When this happens don’t stop to edit the work or consider if it’s right or not. Just let the words come. When you’ve done as much as you can, stop and breathe. Admire your achievement. You’ve gone from nothing to actual words. You’re a star.

This is really all there is to writing a novel. Figuring out the first bit, writing that; figuring out the next bit, writing that, and so on till you have your dirty draft. Then you can start to knock it into shape as a sculptor does the clay.

If you’ve tried all these suggestions and a few more and cleaning the fridge still looks good, ask yourself whether the idea is ready to be written? I frequently find that a major block is often a message from my muse telling me I’m going in the wrong direction. Give your story a shake-up, take it somewhere different and see if that helps. Then go do some mindless chore or sleep on the problem.

Writing Homeworld, Book 3 of my Beacons sci-fi romance series, I was well and truly stuck. After leaving the book alone for a bit I woke up one morning sure that the character I’d thought of as male was actually female. Further, she was a weather engineer, a profession I didn’t know existed until I went looking. As soon as she arrived, the book was off and running.

Procrastination is a strange beast. We may find ourselves doing almost anything but the work when actually, the story is bubbling deep within our subconscious and will surface when it’s ready.

Writer E.L. Doctorow famously said, “Writing is like driving at night in the fog. You can only see as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.”

Is procrastination your problem? What have you tried to get back on track? Please share your experiences here. The blog is moderated to avoid spam but your comments can appear right away if you click “sign me up” at right. I don’t share your details with anyone.

Happy writing!

Valerie

on Twitter @ValerieParv and Facebook

Coming up – Canberra Writers’ Festival 25-27 August 2017

Meet Valerie and her agent, Linda Tate, “in conversation” at

The National Library Friday 25 August 4pm-5pm, details

http://premier.ticketek.com.au/shows/Show.aspx?sh=AUTHORS17

 

Valerie’s latest book, Outback Code, is out now

3 books complete in one volume

For international orders, print & ebook formats,

Booktopia http://tinyurl.com/hj3477e

From Amazon for Kindle http://tinyurl.com/hxmmqsk

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