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Posts tagged ‘imagination’

First Monday Mentoring April – why we need to enjoy the writing process

Welcome to First Monday when I open this blog to the reality of being a writer. Not the precious wrist-on-forehead stuff but the challenges, fears and yes, the joys of the craft.

In the movie version of Lost in Space, there’s a great line that says, “If there’s no time to have any fun, why are we out saving the galaxy?”

Why indeed?

Having fun isn’t just goofing off. It’s how our brains deal with complex issues, make new discoveries and solve problems.

Playing helps you to relax and avoid stress-related illnesses. It stimulates the brain to release endorphins and other natural chemicals that make us feel good and boost our immune systems. Laughter quickens the heartbeat, expands circulation, enhances oxygen intake and is such good exercise for your facial muscles that it helps fight wrinkles.

How can relaxing achieve so much?

It comes back to the division between the logical left brain and the creative right brain, though today these are considered more as divisions of function rather than lines drawn down the middle of the brain.

In general the logical brain is concerned with words, science, maths, rules and reason. The creative brain is more interested in ideas, insights, intuition and imagination. In strange surroundings or under stress, the left brain tends to stay in charge. Only when you let yourself relax does your creative brain have the time and space it needs to generate new ideas and concepts.

This is why going on holiday somewhere new can be a bad choice if you hope to get much writing done. Your left brain will be so busy sorting out where everything is that you may well find writing more difficult, at least for most of us.

Having a regular place where you go to write, whether to a designated office, your bedroom or the local coffee shop is more likely to result in stories and word counts you’ll be happy with.

When I conduct writing workshops I’m well aware of how hard our left brains are working to stay in charge. I tell the group that I don’t expect “good” writing from anyone, only that what they write shows a grasp of the principles we’re exploring.

I aim to set up an atmosphere of what psychotherapist Carl Rogers calls “psychological safety” so everybody feels free to explore ideas, knowing they’ll be encouraged rather than judged or criticised.

I also throw in as much laughter and enjoyment as I can. And there’s always chocolate.

A typical example was the new Story Magic workshop I presented last weekend at the ACT Writers’ Centre in Canberra. I wanted to go beyond all the hype of marketing, publishing and social media that goes with writing today and return the focus to the act of writing itself.

Think about it. Putting a few black scratchings on a page or screen is magical. Writing is the original virtual reality without the need for headsets or goggles. You simply put a collection of black markings on your screen or page and they magically create a whole world inside your reader’s head.

Done well, the scratchings conjure up people we care about, worlds we’d like to live in and adventures that take us away from the cares of everyday life.

Think of Game of Thrones, Wuthering Heights, Hamlet, Dr No, Harry Potter, Romeo and Juliet, Cinderella, The Time Machine. As books they were mere scratchings on a page. Yet they were so successful in conjuring up virtual worlds inside our heads that producers couldn’t wait to turn them into block buster movies and TV.

This to me is true “story magic.”

Taking a more light-hearted approach to your writing isn’t abdicating your grown-up responsibilities. It is giving yourself permission to play which is vital if you are to come up with new ideas and insights that might just turn into the latest best seller.

And if it doesn’t you’ve entertained yourself and many of your friends. You’ve also given your brain a workout designed to keep it healthy while at the very least, staving off some wrinkles.

Not bad for a few scratchings on a page or screen.

As a writer, whatever stage you’re at, do you find laughter and enjoyment helpful to your work? Feel free to share your comments. The blog is moderated to avoid spam but your comments can appear right away if you click “sign me up” at right. I don’t share your details with anyone. Happy (and I do mean happy) writing!

Valerie

on Twitter @ValerieParv and Facebook

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First Monday Mentoring for December – the gifts your writing gives to readers

Welcome to the first Monday in December when I talk about the nitty-gritty of being a writer. A week ago I was reminded of perhaps the best part of the writing life, one we seldom think about – the effect our writing has on other people.

I was reminded of this a week ago while I was in Los Angeles attending a live event hosted by Reading Rainbow, an organisation dedicated to instilling the love of reading and learning in children everywhere. A few months ago, LeVar Burton, original Reading Rainbow TV presenter and Star Trek The Next Generation’s Geordie LaForge, relaunched Reading Rainbow for the 21st century at https://www.readingrainbow.com/

At the event, LeVar and two Star Trek legends, William Shatner and Sir Patrick Stewart, read some childrens’ books to a delighted audience – we adults as enthralled as the children. Then LeVar talked about the power of “what if…” the cornerstone of many a writer’s new idea., and played the Reading Rainbow theme song reminding us that readers can “go anywhere” and “be anything” in their imagination.

After the readings, I got to sit down and chat with Bill Shatner, who readers of this blog know by now is one of my greatest inspirations, as well as LeVar and Sir Patrick. Exciting indeed and a story for another day.

L to R: William Shatner, Levar Burton and Sir Patrick Stewart read at the Reading Rainbow event I attended

L to R: William Shatner, Levar Burton and Sir Patrick Stewart read at the Reading Rainbow event I attended

Writers generally focus on the work of writing, the struggles, fears and disappointments when the story fails to live up to our hopes.

But what about when we succeed?

As Reading Rainbow reminded us, that’s when magic happens.

Whether you write in longhand, on a tablet, on a program such as Scrivener, or on cave walls, the process is the same. You start with a “what if…” and trust that your idea will capture your readers’ imagination the way it did yours.
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In the struggle to birth a story, it’s easy to forget that you’re taking readers on a journey with you, giving them the gift of your creativity and insight. Whether your readers number in the dozens or millions matters not a bit. When you make a story, wrap it in your words, and present it to readers, you’ve shared a piece of your soul.
In troubled times, stories can give hope – not by saying that all men are brothers, but by showing the brother and sisterhood between our characters. Others campaign for an end to domestic violence; we show how that goal might come about. When the future seems bleak, we show a positive future, as Star Trek itself has done since its first airing nearly 50 years ago.

These are gifts writers have been giving to the world since the cave days. Whether you celebrate Channukah, Christmas, Kwanzaa or any other festive season, you are giving the world your gift of possibilities through your stories.

How you publish is also less important than, what and why you write. It may be a beloved hobby or your life’s work, as writing has been mine for decades. What matters is the sharing of your ideas with your family and the wider world.

The ability to create stories is a rare blessing. I believe it’s the reason why we keep writing despite the pain of rejection and the frustration of chasing a near-impossible dream. As the song says, we are aiming for a star that seems unreachable much of the time. But when we do reach it, the sense of achievement is incomparable.
You’ve spoken your thoughts through your writing, and been heard and understood by at least one reader. There’s nothing quite like it.

This season, I wish that feeling for all writers. Write because you love it; because you must; and because it’s the most fun you can have and still call it work.

If it’s in you to write – write. Don’t let anyone or anything stop you. Your vocation is to be a bringer of light to the world. Do it with joy and pride, and the curiosity of a child. Write even when it hurts.
The more you write, the more you’ll discover you can write. Only by sharing your words are you truly honouring your gift.

Feel free to comment or share your experiences below. The blog is moderated to avoid spam. If you’d like your comments to appear right away, click on “sign me up” at right. I don’t share your details with anyone.

To all writers everywhere, thank you for giving me the gift of your stories and letting me share the fruits of your imagination. They make you more special than you will ever know.

Valerie

http://www.valerieparv.com
on Twitter @ValerieParv and Facebook

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