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Posts tagged ‘writing conference’

First Monday Mentoring for June – your writing questions answered

It’s baaa-aack, the first Monday of every month (or the first Sunday if you’re in the northern hemisphere) when I invite you to post your writing-related questions and I’ll  answer them here. Lots of talented writers read and comment on this blog and you’re also welcome to contribute a question or your thoughts on an answer, or a writing experience that might help others.

Feel free to post writing concerns and questions, and share experiences. Questions can be posted ahead of time if you like and I will answer during Monday June 4.  I monitor the blog and post answers throughout the day.

To kick things off, here are a couple of questions I was asked during the last week.

Is it worthwhile for a writer to attend conferences?

Mostly the answer is yes,  no matter where you are in your writing journey. New writers can meet like-minded people, and make the vital discovery that you’re not alone in your struggles. A writing conference is also the best place to meet editors and agents on an informal basis, or you can sign up through the conference to pitch an idea to them. If they like the sound of your idea, they’ll ask you to send it to their publishing house or agency, and you get to put the magic words “requested material” on the package, dodging the towering slush piles.

How do you know when it’s time to give up on a particular book?

This is tough. If J K Rowling had given up after the many rejections she received, the Harry Potter books wouldn’t be household names. Rejections are part of writing life. If you receive only a form letter, it could be the publisher had no room for further books in the schedule; or they may have something similar to yours in production. If you receive specific suggestions, take that as definite encouragement. Editors don’t waste time commenting on work that’s going nowhere. If there’s something in the suggestions you can use, by all means do, but be wary of extensive rewrites unless the editor has asked to see it again. Another editor may love it as it is, or have different ideas again. Only when you receive repeated comments along similar lines – your book lacks pace; the characters aren’t believeable, or whatever, might you consider taking another look.

You can also treat the book as part of your learning curve.

Set it aside. Start something new. Later when you’re published, you may see how to rework the previous book, or use the ideas in another book.  I’ve heard many writers say they’re glad their first efforts didn’t see the light of day because they’ve grown so much as they’ve kept writing.

Got a question? Advanced or basic, I’ll do my best to answer.

Valerie

http://www.valerieparv.com

Proud friend of the National Year of Reading 2012

Established Writer in Residence 2012, Katharine Susannah Prichard Centre, Perth WA

On Twitter @valerieparv

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Writing conferences, 5 reasons why they’re worth your time and money

When asked whether he thought writing courses stifle writers, Ernest Hemingway famously said he didn’t think they stifled enough of them. You have to wonder what he’d think of the Romance Writers of Australian national conference taking place next week in Melbourne, where 350 writers are gathering to catch up with friends  and share information about the craft. Certainly not stifled.

www.theage.com.au is a good article about what’s coming up.

Already the net is abuzz with the excitement of those attending, me included. My suitcase sits open and half packed, my notes and giveaways for the workshops I’m presenting are ready. I’ll be talking on Creativity and Feeding the Muse at the Published Author Day next Thursday, then on The Art of Layering Your Romance Novel with Jennie Adams on Saturday.  Other sessions range from social media and marketing to staging a convincing fight scene.

Learning is a big part of writing conferences

From this you might think the benefit of being there is mainly in learning from experts. While that’s a big part of what conferences are about, here are some other reasons I think they rock.

1. You catch up with colleagues you only “meet” online the rest of the year

2. You find out what everybody else has been writing

3. You load up your case with free books as well as the booty from the conference bookstore

4. Somebody else feeds and cares for you during the event (writers with families know how amazing this feels)

And most importantly:

5. You find out you’re not the only person in the world who…….(fill in the gap)

#5 is huge, because all of us at some stage have thought we were the only one getting sucky feedback from editors, going through a dry patch when ideas were non existent, unable to write because of life in general,  or thinking a day job at McD’s was looking good. Knowing others are in the same boat can lift your spirits and get you back in the game faster than almost anything.

Right now there’s a huge amount of upheaval in publishing. Nobody really knows where we’re headed, making it even harder to write than usual – and it’s tough enough in the good times. Being among like-minded friends can reassure you that it IS worthwhile hanging in there, writing the book of your heart and trying to get it published. When something is hard, it’s usually the most rewarding when you make it.

Then there’s the social side of cocktail party, awards dinner, charity auctions and hanging out with friends in lobby, coffee shop or late night bar. Everybody gets something different out of this side, but we all come away feeling supported, encouraged and fired up to get back to the keyboard.

If that’s not enough to justify the time and cost, there are those other magic words – tax deductible.

Are you going to a conference soon or have been to one lately? What was the best thing about it for you?

Valerie

 

 

 

 

 

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